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Posts Tagged ‘conferences’

See You at ZendCon 2009

Tuesday, October 6th, 2009

ZendCon 2009 Speaker

I’m looking forward to seeing everyone at ZendCon 2009, “the premier PHP conference”. I was selected to present a session:

Enterprise-Class PHP Security

Oxymoron no more! Learn what high-stakes organizations expect when evaluating the security of PHP applications. We’ll cover formal standards and processes, and tips on how to successfully navigate through the minefield.

Selected for php|tek Unconference Session

Wednesday, May 27th, 2009

I delivered my updated talk – Crypto Your PHP – at the php|tek Unconference in Chicago on Thursday, May 21st. It was selected by a voting process from a field that included many well-known community leaders. In other words I was lucky to have the opportunity. Kudos to everyone who submitted talks and thanks to those who voted, attended and organized!

Synopsis:

If you’d like a refresher on crypto capabilities and practices in PHP, or if you’d like some tips on the topic from a former security engineer, this talk is for you. We’ll discuss a few common scenarios such as data transit, data storage, and password authentication. We’ll explore the rich variety of crypto-enabled functions available to PHP. We’ll see why some crypto algorithms are better than others. And we’ll discuss the practices of good crypto implementation and the clues that indicate when it’s not a good idea to build it alone.

Crypto Your PHP

Friday, April 24th, 2009

I just gave a talk on PHP cryptography via webcast, as part of the free webcast series for the php|tek conference. Thanks to Keith Casey for the kind intro and for organizing the webcast series. I hope to see many of you at tek in May – I’ll submit an updated version of this talk for the php|tek Unconference.

A video recording will be posted on the webcast web page and at Blue Parabola, and the slides are here. Please feel free to ask questions and to leave any other feedback as comments to this post.

How to Make Application Security Suck Less

Wednesday, June 4th, 2008

Application security sucks because it’s a wicked hard problem to mix the goals of security and application development within real-life projects.

If application development is about making an app do what it’s supposed to do, then application security is about making sure an app doesn’t do what it’s not supposed to do, despite real world conditions which may be hostile and chaotic.

“Hard core” security has become a massively complex black art with its own priesthood. As a result, the security community has generated an enormous volume of arcane information about security vulnerabilities and countermeasures.

Many conference presentations, books and articles about application security have tried to boil that down for the developer community, with excellent coverage of the top several types of security flaws. But security has a long tail, so that approach leaves vast territory uncovered.

That approach also doesn’t necessarily give developers the context and perspective necessary to judge the costs and benefits of security, and to make sound decisions about what really does or doesn’t need to be done. So I decided to address application security in a different way.

I gave a talk on this topic yesterday at the 2008 DC PHP Conference in Washington, DC. I’m posting a copy of the presentation slides and speaker notes for all of you here.

The goal of this talk is to help you wrap your brain around core concepts of application security, and thereby to make it easier to deal with correctly.

The talk begins with “What is Security, Really?”, poking fun at misconceptions and presenting the idea that security is keeping bad events to a minimum despite even skillful attempts to cause them.

Then it covers fundamental concepts and practices including: how to identify what needs protection; vulnerabilities and countermeasures with PHP examples; and how to avoid security excess by considering risk in a consistent way.

By the end, you should have a conceptual framework for application security that will at the same time simplify the problem space and provide more rigorous results.

So it’ll suck less.

DC PHP Conference & Expo, June 2-4, 2008

Sunday, April 13th, 2008

I’m going to talk about “How to Make Application Security Suck Less” at this international conference, hosted locally in Washington, DC.

The keynote speakers will be Kshemendra Paul from OMB, Christopher Jones from Oracle, and Chris Shiflett from OmniTI.

Local PHP agitator Keith Casey will moderate the featured panel discussion on PHP IDEs. Panelists will be: Cal Evans (Zend), Wez Furlong (OmniTI), David Sklar (Ning), Eli White (Digg), and Jeff Griffiths (ActiveState).

I’m looking forward to the interesting people, informative talks and great conversations that I expect based on last year’s experience. Hope to see you there!

DC PHP Conference 2007 – Security Highlights

Monday, November 12th, 2007

This year’s conference had a fairly heavy dose of security.

Chris Shiflett’s keynote, “Security 2.0″, included nice discussions of XSS (cross-site scripting) and CSRF (cross-site request forgery) with an AJAX scenario.

Ed Finkler presented on the PHPSecInfo project, a tool to scan the PHP environment for security issues, and Inspekt, a PHP library to protect applications from the potentially tainted contents of superglobals.

Eli White presented “Help, My Website Has Been Hacked! Now What?” and covered how to prepare for and respond to hacking incidents, based on his experiences at Digg.

Damien Seguy presented on MySQL Security.

While not primarily security-related, Keith Casey included some discussion about security while presenting “Designing REST Web Services”.

DC PHP Conference 2007

Tuesday, November 6th, 2007

I’m going to the DC PHP Conference 2007 in Washington, DC, November 7-9. The keynote will be “Security 2.0″ by Chris Shiflett. Looking forward to seeing the PHP security guru in action, and I’ll probably run into several members of the DC PHP Developers Group.